• 07 3144 1655
  • 07 3144 1656
  • 51 Ballow Street, Fortitude Valley 4006

Information for
Patients and Parents

Your Visit
Valley Eye Specialists

Depending on why you have been referred to see an ophthalmologist, your visit will probably involve a number of steps.

  1. Your referral letter from your optometrist, GP or other medical practitioner
  2. Your Medicare card and private health insurance details (if applicable)

Please note that you will receive a rebate from Medicare towards the cost of your consultation and some of the tests performed at your appointment.  Private health insurance providers do not provide a rebate towards these services.

  • A list of any current medications or drops that you regularly take or use.
  • Results of any tests, x-rays or scans that you have had prior to your appointment.
  • Your glasses or contact lenses.
  1. When you arrive, you will be asked to complete an information sheet to provide us with information regarding your past medical history, allergies and any regular over the counter or prescribed medications you may take.  This information may already have been provided in your referral letter, however it is important that we have the most up to date information on file in order to provide you with the best care possible.
  2. You will then be seen by an orthoptist or an ophthalmic technician, who are specially trained in performing tests to assess all aspects of you vision and eye health.  They will first check things like vision and eye pressure, will measure your glasses, and may then perform further special tests upon consultation with your ophthalmologist.
  3. Further test that may be performed include:
    • Optos wide field retinal imaging
    • Humphrey computerised visual field test
    • OCT scan (macula and optic nerve)
    • Ultrasound scan
    • Pentacam scan
    • Retinal fluorescein angiogram
  4. You may then need to have special drops instilled into your eyes to dilate (“open up”) your pupils – this allows a complete and thorough examination of your eyes by your ophthalmologist.  If these drops are required, your vision will become blurry and your eyes will be more sensitive to light than usual.  

The effects of these drops last for at least two hours, and during this time you will not be able to drive.  This is an important consideration – you may wish to be accompanied by a relative or friend who can drive you home, or plan alternative methods of transport (e.g. taxi, bus, train) for your appointment.

Your Child’s Visit
Valley Eye Specialists

If this is your child’s first appointment with an ophthalmologist, it is important that you know what to expect.

  1. Your child’s referral letter from your optometrist, GP, paediatrician or other medical practitioner
  2. Your child’s Medicare card and private health insurance details (if applicable)

Please note that you will receive a rebate from Medicare towards the cost of your child’s consultations and some of the tests performed at your child’s appointment.  Private health insurance providers do not provide a rebate towards these services.

  • A list of any current medications or drops that your child regularly takes or uses.
  • Results of any tests, x-rays or scans that your child has had prior to your appointment.
  • Glasses or contact lenses worn by your child.

  1. When you arrive, you will be asked to complete an information sheet to provide us with information regarding your child’s past medical history, allergies and any regular over the counter or prescribed medications they may take.  This information may already have been provided in your referral letter, however it is important that we have the most up to date information on file in order to provide your child with the best care possible.
  2. Your child will then be seen by an orthoptist or ophthalmic technician, who are specially trained in performing tests to assess all aspects of your child’s vision and eye health.  They will first check things like vision, eye pressure, eye position and eye movements.  Sometimes they will then perform further special tests upon consultation with your child’s ophthalmologist, which may include:
    • Optos wide field retinal imaging – this is a high-resolution colour image of the back of the eye
    • Humphrey computerised visual field test – this checks your child’s peripheral vision
    • OCT scan (macula and optic nerve)
    • Ultrasound scan
    • Pentacam scan
  3. The orthoptist or technician will then usually instill special drops into your child’s eyes to dilate (“open up”) their pupils – this allows a complete and thorough examination by their ophthalmologist.

  4. These drops will take up to 30 minutes to work, and your child’s pupils will remain enlarged for around eight hours afterwards.  This means that your child’s vision will be a little blurry and their eyes will be more sensitive to light than usual throughout this time.

  5. Your child will then be seen by an ophthalmologist, who will explore all facets of your child’s vision and health and perform a thorough ophthalmic examination.

Please allow up to two hours for your appointment if this is your child’s first visit.  Follow-up visits may be quicker, as all of the above steps will not necessarily need to be completed each time.

What to expect
Day Surgery

Our ophthalmologists currently provide surgery through Queensland Eye Hospital, a private day surgery facility in Spring Hill.  From early 2020, we will also provide surgery through a selection of other private hospital and day surgery facilities.

What to expect
Before Your Surgery

What to do before your scheduled surgery, including fasting instructions and possible changes to your regular medications (e.g. blood thinning medications or medications for diabetes), will be discussed with you by your surgeon and/or anaesthetist ahead of time.  Confirmation of all instructions will be provided by the relevant facility on the day before surgery, including the time you should arrive at the facility.

General fasting instructions
For Children

As a general rule, no food, drink or baby formula should be given in the six hours prior to surgery.  Babies who are breastfed should not be given breastmilk in the four hours prior to surgery.  Water or clear apple juice is acceptable up to two hours prior to surgery.

Anaesthesia
For Surgery

The type of anaesthetic required for surgery will be discussed with you at the time of booking your surgery, and an anaesthetist will be present on the day of your surgery to further run through and clarify the options, including risks and benefits.  Types of anaesthesia generally include:

  • Local anaesthetic only
  • Local anaesthetic with sedation
  • General anaesthetic

Admission
Day Surgery

On arrival at the surgical facility, reception staff will admit you and check that all your paperwork is in order.  You will be asked to visit the bathroom to change.  It is unwise to bring any jewellery or valuables, as these may need to be removed and kept for you during your surgery.  You may then need to have eye drops instilled in your eye/s to prepare for surgery.

Your surgeon, anaesthetist and nursing staff will ensure you are comfortable during your procedure.

Post-operatively, you will spend some time in a recovery area under the care of expert nursing staff.  Once the recovery team, together with your surgeon and anaesthetist, are confident that you are recovering well, you will be able to go home under the care of a support person.  This process usually takes three to four hours.

Before you leave the surgical facility, you will be given detailed information regarding any drops or other medications you will need to start using, together with a time for a follow up phone call or appointment with your surgeon for the following day.

It is important to remember that you will need to have someone available to meet you and take you home after your procedure, and to stay with you overnight.

Meet Our Ophthalmologists

Dr Camuglia is a General Adult and Paediatric Ophthalmologist with subspecialist fellowship training in …

Dr Jayne Camuglia

BSc MBBS FRANZCO

Dr Dai is an experienced Paediatric Ophthalmologist and Strabismus Surgeon, and is the current Director of Ophthalmology …

Associate Professor Shuan Dai

MBBS FRANZCO

Professor Gole is an experienced Paediatric Ophthalmologist and Strabismus Surgeon, who holds …

Professor Glen A Gole

MBBS MD (NSW) FRANZCO FRACS FRCOphth (Lond)

Dr Richa Sharma is an experienced General Ophthalmologist with subspecialty fellowship training in Paediatric Ophthalmology …

Dr Richa Sharma

MBBS MS FRANZCO

Dr Pappalardo began her medical studies at the University of Queensland School of Medicine …

Dr Juanita Pappalardo

BPharm MBBS
Adult & Paediatric Ophthalmology Fellow

Born in country Queensland, Dr Jaclyn White was raised and educated in Brisbane. She commenced her tertiary studies at QUT …

Dr Jaclyn White

B.App.Sc (Med.Sc), MBBS
Adult & Paediatric Ophthalmology Fellow

Dr Denis Stark is a Queensland medical graduate who trained as an ophthalmologist in Brisbane and Glasgow, Scotland …

Dr Denis Stark

MBBS(Qld) FRCS (Edin) FRANZCO

Close Menu